Autism, Steampunk, and Comic Books – An Invitation into My World

March 28th, 2017 is an especially happy day for me.

Someone very special to me celebrates their birthday!

Today is the 25th anniversary of Christian Laettner’s Shot. #sorrynotsorry

ZekeZapAs March closes, our team invite our fans to consider Captain Zeke Zap of Face Value Comics.

Captain Zeke Zap loves his steampunk aerial drones. As leader of the para-military group, “E-Z Squad”, Cap’n Zap employs different drones for combat, communication, and spying. The Blind Blaster of Blue Fox Bay uses kinetic energy created by drone movement to see through his cybernetic-like eyes.

For example, I asked our artist, Sky Owens, to create a special drone for our comic book story. I described this drone as having a pint-sized canister of pressurized helium. Add legs/wheels for eventual landing balance. Place a boxy Victorian camera atop the canister. Position small propellers at each corner, and an inflatable balloon in the center. As remote control levers flip, propellers move and direct this drone. Pressurized gas inflates the balloon and gives it height, and cause propeller blades to spin as the gas circulates through different hoses and valves. Captain Zap can “see” what the camera lens sees as it moves (but not while this drone is stationary), using “bio-kinetic” energy. Add a small megaphone to the drone body, or create another drone for a separate source of information.

Can you imagine this drone, and how it could be used in the Victorian steampunk era? Can you do better? Sky’s artistic interpretation will appear in an upcoming issue…

Would you, or someone you love with autism, want to be part of our creative comic book experiences?

Using the information suggestion table below, decide your level of skill. Also note: we won’t need documentation nor verification of an autism diagnosis; we use an honor system for possible submissions.

SKILL LEVEL ART WRITING
Beginner Can draw/ink/color a steampunk drone. Can verbally and logically describe an aerial drone that seems plausible during the Victorian steampunk era.
Intermediate …in a scene with implied action(s) where this drone and Zeke Zap are featured. …with interesting sci-fi twists regarding its functionality, purpose, use, consequences, relationship with Zeke Zap, etc.
Advanced …and build upon cause-and-effect relationships of the steampowered drone functions in a series of sequential art. …and artful direct scenes of sequential art that incorporates and features Captain Zap and this new drone.

This invitation may spark many questions from our fans. Based on the number of inquiries, we are prepared to continue the conversation about including autistic-created fan art in future publications. Furthermore, we may explore mentoring potential autistic talent in the comic book creation business.

For now, consider your skill levels. Practice. Read (free) guides on drawing and storytelling. Let your imagination soar. This sample direction (see table, above) serves as suggestions. Again, based on fan inquiries about this opportunity, we will discuss submission guidelines throughout April 2017.

At worst, you’ve something to do on a rainy day. At best, we will help mentor new talent with the community’s help. Please save submissions until we set a definitive date; all submissions received before a designated date will not be considered for legal reasons. (I was told I had to write that last line. –Dave)

What questions do you have?

Autism (Self) Advocacy = Best Advocacy

I want our social media to be a safe place for persons living with autism. Here, I want to discuss comic books, education sciences, safety, and self-worth. My goal is to offer hope by invoking these topics, and providing positive examples.

Autism advocacy must evolve, because society always changes. However, our path forward seems foggy. In our household, we have two individuals with two different expressions of autism. Aside from kindness, love, and patience, “autism advocacy” will mean many different things under our roof.

Therefore, I am shifting my focus about autism advocacy. I will begin more self-advocacy and self-disclosure. You are invited along for my journey. These experiences will unfold in future blog posts, videos, and comic books.

An important and lengthy telephone call helped cement this direction. Talking with our artist, Sky Owens, he posed an important question: do we want Face Value Comics to be a socio-political soapbox, or a kid-friendly story about a hero like themselves? Why would an autistic person choose our comic book over any other title? Readers expect comic book stylized action sequences, so what abilities, motivations, or personality makes the Zephyr a hero to kids with autism?

As we expand our comic book line, these questions help remind me of my original goal: kids need heroes like themselves. This means curbing my own misguided self-righteousness against any number of specific social ills. Instead, larger and more relatable arcs can be represented.

In future blog posts, I will likely ask very candid questions. Make no mistake: I seek thoughtful answers, not conspiracy theories, political rhetoric, circular answers, nor “alternative facts.” With some questions, I will certainly appear unintelligent. I am. The longer I fight for autism (self) advocacy, the more I realize how much I do not understand. Aren’t some problems with autism tied to misunderstanding unwritten social expectations?

Our world changes daily. Information doubles exponentially. How do we juggle real life demands while being autism advocates? I submit self-care and self-advocacy are our best achievements. At the end of each day, being our best selves is the best form of advocacy anyone can do. I cannot address nor imagine what your “best self” is; only you and your loved ones can help. As for me, I ask you to follow me as I (re)explore autism self-advocacy. Together, we can learn. Together, we can be equals, knowing we try our best to be our best.

myra-z2

We’ve finished twelve pages of our next comic book. We have clear examples of emotive facial expressions, villains coded by color gradients (“Cool” colors = good; “Warm” colors = bad), PG-graded action/combat situations, steampunk imagery, and heroic endings (or cliffhangers). We anticipate a release this spring, and will continue to keep our fans apprised of news.

Welcome, Betsy “The Boss” Devos

January 19, 2017

Betsy Devos’ nomination and (likely) confirmation as Secretary of Education ushers in a new era of autism advocacy. Many autism advocates malign Ms. Devos’ inexperience, lucrative political campaign contributions, and misunderstanding of IDEA. However, I welcome these obvious flaws to a candidate overseeing (autism) education. History is on our side. Specifically, I point to:

Brown v Board of Education, and the power of litigation to redress social disjunction.

To be clear, nobody really “wins” any lawsuit. Presumed damages have occurred, we resurrect painful memories in court, and lots of money goes to shark lawyers. What other options might we have before filing suit?

Ask Hillary Clinton the value of popular votes in an election.

Ask #BlackLivesMatter how many African-Americans still suffer police brutality.

Ask Planned Parenthood how well 78,000 signatures persuaded the Speaker of the House.

I believe our advances for inclusive education, employment, healthcare and housing will fall flat if we plan to reinvent broken wheels. I’ll invoke the definition of “insanity” and compare our advocacy techniques to other failed examples. We need a new approach under a new political administration. Having obviously-flawed candidates, like Devos, helps us.

By his own words, President Trump does not understand autism. I doubt Devos understands autism, based on her confusion about IDEA. We’ve no openly-autistic representative in Congress- none. If we believe billionaires lead our county, we must also accept how well they fear and know the word, “lawsuit.” Many build and protect their fortune and influence on this word.

If we cannot have discussions about autism with autistic leaders, we must use language our leaders know. “Charity?” “Compassion?” “Empathy?” “Inclusion?” Do these words best describe Trump or his Education nominee? We may as well speak Japanese to them, but we have history on our side to invoke business terms. “Lawsuit” means action.

I’m waiting for 2017’s autism-based version of Brown v Board of Education. This is how we slay the giants of misunderstanding- one, well placed lawsuit to destroy their credibility and strip them of misguided power. We strike a blow against their fortune now and in the future; will organizations readily side with someone named in a SCOTUS lawsuit? My approach is non-violent, doesn’t require a large following, leapfrogs media value, and is multicultural in acceptance and execution. We skip what has been tried, and has failed. If we’ve had the presumably best advocates before Devos, I question the quality of our advocacy today. Devos gives us the best recourse for positive change if she doesn’t do a good job. If she fails us, like many suspect, I’ve outlined a peaceable solution using the foul language of the Economic Elite.

Please, give us Devos. I hope she does an excellent job. If not, you call your Congressional representative; I’ll call a (fame-and-fortune seeking) lawyer, of which there are more than Congressional representatives. Which phone call will affect the most positive outcome? Which call will force change? Which call will make Devos shake in her Pradas?

Gearseeker Serpent & Autism Acceptance

What does autism acceptance look like? Will we need a celebrity proclaiming it via social media? Will an elected official – someone who is not autistic – pass legislation mandating said acceptance?

Playing a collectible card game (and my friend, Trav) helped teach me something new about autism acceptance. Please don’t become distracted by too many details of this collectible trading card. Gearseeker Serpent means something to us as autism advocates.

gearseekerserpent

Copyright/Trademark Acknowledgement: Everything about GEARSEEKER SERPENT belongs to Wizards of the Coast, except my interpretation.

Apparently, I can summon this creature faster if I have help; specifically, lots of artifacts lure him into play. I doubt I can play this card on my first turn of the game. How about Turn Two? Is Turn Four reasonable, or too late? I begin to deconstruct the perfect scenario in which I see Gearseeker Serpent devouring my opponent. Now, build to this goal.

Here’s our lesson about autism acceptance, from Gearseeker Serpent:

BEGIN WITH A VISUALIZED GOAL IN MIND.

What is “autism acceptance” to you? What may have happened to encourage others’ acceptance? Will you need help? How much help do you think you’ll need, and when will you need help? Deconstruct the perfect scenario in which you feel most accepted, and identify those incremental steps towards tolerance. Now, built to this goal.

Without specific goal setting, we may lose focus. We might fail to acknowledge necessary early steps towards our goal if we only focus on the END GOAL. Others will liken us to some Greek Myth, whereby we gluttonously demand more acceptance, while ignoring acceptance growing around us, forever self-tormented. Stop demanding global, ephemeral autism “acceptance,” and develop your goals towards that result. Cultivate strategic planning, ask for help, and autism “acceptance” will happen.

Otherwise, Gearseeker Serpent and the weight of unfulfilled should-isms threaten to crush us individually and collectively. Please share your specific examples of autism acceptance goals in the comments, below.

Prophetic Autism and 2017 Goals

Face Value Comics cannot be your ‘opus,’ because it suggests you’ve nothing more to give.

My wife, Angela, shared her hopes for me as 2016 closed. In this blog update, I want to share more goals with you. Will you help keep me accountable for positive autism advocacy?

What content would you like to see from an adult living with autism? Please feel free to review past blog posts, including one where I predicted a loss of civil rights for individuals with autism. Additionally, I outlined a tax-free way to add $1k for autism-based classroom instruction. As a former professional helper, I discussed an airtight strategy that’s been 100% funded by third-party insurances. I shared how facial feature recognition helps me navigate social situations, too.

I also enjoy comic books, including writing script. In 2017, we debut a smaller story and new characters: Quantum X, in Outfox Magazine. Have you subscribed to their autism-friendly publication yet? Here’s our story cover image:

quantun-x-cover
Cover Art for #1 Quantum-X. Fantastic Art by Sky Owens!

However, I also experience some significant health concerns for which I receive professionally-adequate treatments. Despite having nearly three years of script outlined, I cannot remember what or why I wrote what I originally did. Sometimes, I have no memory of many things, so recording my goals helps increase accountability. When I feel too ill to write in depth, I’ll share why, and how I’m trying to overcome a specific challenge.

As we discuss autism, I want to remain positive; edge-lords and trolls need not apply. As I try certain self-improvement goals, I realize how damaging blame and doubt becomes. Instead, let’s remember how everything outlives us on the Internet. Together, we will be a solid leadership resource for increasing autism acceptance. Follow me, and be sure to leave a suggestion for an autism topic in the comments section!

I will write more…next time.

–Dave

Why we’re angry, dear Rosie…

Dear Ms. Rosie O’Donnell:

More than a week passed since we last chatted, albeit one-sided, about autism advocacy. Our fans wish you roaring success with your upcoming performance, and hope you are well. If people read anything more recent about you, I think many would be alarmed by the outpouring of hate directed at you regarding your armchair diagnosis of Barron Trump. We needn’t add fuel to that fire. Instead, I’m offering insight as a fellow rights activist and (self) advocate.

If people are angered by your lack of credentials to offer a diagnosis, I think their anger is misplaced. If people dislike you because of your own open identity, we aren’t likely to solve homophobia in this blog post. More importantly, I’m not sure you – or anyone who flippantly diagnoses someone with autism – understands the real damage.

You betrayed us, Rosie.

Within the autism community, many of us struggle with implied, unwritten social cues. However, most of us grew up and learned about the Golden Rule: Do unto others as you’d have them do unto you. Rosie, you broke that rule.

Spin your dialogue. Would you appreciate someone from the autism community saying another person was obviously gay because of how they look for thirty seconds? Even if that person’s experience and vigilance within the LGBTQ community would lend some credit to observations, is it anyone else’s right to out them as gay? If this approach is not okay with you, why is it okay for you to do something similar?

Hypervigilance with your own daughter’s autism diagnosis may lend you small credit, to recognize symptoms. Being good at computer work or mathematics makes someone autistic as much as (insert LGBTQ stereotype, here) makes someone gay. We fight hard to correct social misperceptions; please don’t add more misdirection.

We could presume you have nothing but benevolence towards a man and his family. Refresh my memory: is this the same man and his family whom you battled on Twitter during the Presidential Election this year? Do you doubt Barron Trump will have the absolute best medical care as the son of the United States President-Elect? Do you think you know better than a physician, Rosie? You act like you do.

…and that’s why people feel anger. May I offer a solution? Tweet how your intentions were born from compassion for a young person. Start a discussion about his father’s lack of understanding about autism, and the need for more openly autistic legislators and representatives. Share how you may have mourn(ed) Dakota’s lost potential following an autism diagnosis; we’ll understand and work through this very common grief with you. Invite more advocates to work with you, and stop making our advocacy work harder in 140 characters or less.

Let’s have tea next week, okay?

Be well and break a leg,

Dave Kot

Playing by Your ‘Elf

Dear Santa Wil Wheaton,

During the holidays, many eager games want new toys. As a gamer myself, I enjoy watching episodes of “Table Top.” We play many similar games, and I wonder what other experiences we share.

At first, I researched what single-player games you might have reviewed. While played with a bunch of friends on Table TopZombie Dice can be a brief yet fun distracting game. Recently, I got Dungeon Roll, which also can be played as a single player or with a small group. Do you review any other single-player games? Next, I began (re)reading your blog. Again, we seem to have similar ideas about civility, government, and, well, hobbies like gaming. I also appreciate your candor in addressing mental health, including anxiety and depression. Do you understand autism, too?

Here’s what I want for the holidays, Santa Wil: May we chat about our shared interest of games? Specifically, I’d like to steer the conversation into solo game play, for individual fans of our shared audience who may not easily find fellow competitive gamers, or who otherwise prefer singular play. How many more people with anxiety, autism, and depression could find a healthy outlet by playing more games- even single-player games? Later, we can debate the merits of decision making, organization skills, etc. that some games may offer a single player. Please message us through this blog post if you’d like to continue this idea.

I’ve been a good boy, this year, Wil. I’ve played new games, and am writing more comic books, too. An opportunity to collaborate on behalf of more gamers with mental health social challenges would be a wonderful way to wrap-up 2016.

If any elves might have been reading over Wil’s shoulder (or Wil himself), what other single-player games might you or readers suggestion for their loved ones with autism, anxiety, or depression? This season, let’s presume greater competence for more people to play more games!

Be well,

Dave Kot, Author at Face Value Comics – The World’s 1st Featured Comic Book Hero with Autism

DISCLAIMER: I am in no way affiliated with any of the games, pictures, or websites linked or referenced; those references, aside from Face Value Comics, are not connected to me and are their rightful owners’ intellectual property, copyright, trademark, etc.

Diarrhea and Low-Functioning Autism

After Thanksgiving dinner, I had diarrhea.

This example may give some readers pause as they flash signs of contempt or disgust. However, most people share a personal understanding of brief diarrhea. Exact causes may be difficult to pinpoint, but usually involve complex chemistry of fluid imbalance. Other factors, like stress, may warrant consideration, too. Still, most people can empathize and sympathize with this gastrointestinal challenge. In polite company, we refrain from sharing our toileting experiences. This is an unwritten social rule. I contend how diarrhea may only momentarily detract from our daily routines or work performances, though. As filthy as diarrhea might be, we understand it well enough from our own experiences, and still dislike addressing it. I wonder how proud actors feel whilst filming commercials for an over-the-counter anti-diarrhea medication.

Unconsciously, we might assign those negative images of watery feces to the person having diarrhea. We give the ill person distance, to avoid contracting diarrhea ourselves. We encourage bed rest, medication, and other things which completely remove them from future conversations until WE think they act or feel …

…wait for it…

“normal.” Despite our intimate knowledge of diarrhea, we automatically shun anyone who currently experiences it. We devalue their contributions because we assume their illness also affects mental alertness or other skills we otherwise expect. We seek to avoid contamination ourselves, and scrub our hands with anti-bacterial soap. Flush our relationship until the illness passes. We may want our friends to rest, or we may want nothing to do with a stranger who ate gas-station sushi.

Why are we so dismissive and lack compassion for an experience we likely have all shared and at least conceptually understand? Couldn’t a person with diarrhea still draw, still code, still do a lot of non-physically challenging things of value? I believe this person can add value. However, society caps their presumed potential until their diarrhea passes and they “act” less of an uncomfortable threat to our societal expectations.

1 in 68 persons has autism, and I believe more than this ratio have had diarrhea. Not as many people understand autism as well as diarrhea. Making understanding more difficult, we ascribe words like “low functioning” as a description. No, we may not come out and say “low functioning.” Instead, we use words like “high functioning autism,” which immediately supposes its counter-point: low-functioning autism. Likewise, we avoid invoking the word, “diarrhea” because we know peer judgement follows. Instead, words like “upset stomach” or “wiped out” seem more polite. What is a nicer way of saying “low functioning autism?” Yeah, there aren’t any, and you’re foolish to think aggressors won’t prey upon this distinction. Even worse, I contend some people with “higher functioning autism” also know how to throw bully-wolves off their scent by making such comparisons.

“I don’t have diarrhea; I’ve a tummy ache.” “I might have autism, but it’s ‘HIGH functioning autism.'”  Both sentences desperately seek acceptance, and use language to seem more approachable. I believe most people know what diarrhea looks like, but doubt many of these same people could identify two clinical needs which warrant a lower functional categorization. Instead, society fumbles with perceptions over what “low” functioning might be, even if their examples seem disconnected to autism. This becomes a dangerous enterprise, adding more doubt, myths, and missed opportunities for our community as a whole.

Instead, leave the adjectives “high functioning” and “low functioning” autism to the clinicians who crafted the words for their own medical processes. Stop manufacturing more reasons for polite society to fear or further distance themselves from an impolite conversation. As a collection of human beings, we cannot have easy discussions about loose stool, so why do we think invoking high/low functionalities will improve understandings of autism without similar contempt, disgust, or fear of known diarrhea?

Please add to this conversation if you have a counter-point. I boldly contend that we should erase the use of autism functionalities outside of our clinicians’ offices. Someone saying they’ve “high functioning” autism is really saying, “Yes, I’m autistic, BUT please don’t confuse me for someone with low-functioning autism, because I know you won’t give me any chances otherwise.” I dare anyone who identifies as having “high-functioning” autism to say it WITH a person who has “low functioning” autism also present, and then point to that person and call ’em “low functioning” to their face. OWN that glorified trap, if you must insist on its non-clinical use. Outside of educational/medical care, can you name any situation where identifying an autism functionality is helpful to the individual, the recipient of that information, or “polite” society (the same group who cannot stomach talks of diarrhea) as we seek greater acceptance?  Nah, we won’t have acceptance from neurotypical folk until we can accept ourselves.

Dear Rosie…An Open Letter about Autism (Probably Part 1 of Many)

AN OPEN LETTER TO ROSIE O’DONNELL, PART ONE

Over the Thanksgiving break, I read about Rosie O’Donnell. Via Twitter, O’Donnell acknowledges how her young daughter has an autism diagnosis. We applaud her bravery to seek a definitive diagnosis to explain whatever challenges Dakota may have. Furthermore, we welcome O’Donnell as a staunch advocate for positive change.

Millions love Rosie O’Donnell as a comedic entertainer. We watched her spar with (now, President-Elect) Donald Trump through social media. Obviously both O’Donnell and Trump have each others’ attention and respond in kind.

Now hypervigilant about autism symptoms, O’Donnell took to Twitter on November 21st and asked a question related to autism. Her tweet is embedded here, but I chose not to activate the video link; the video itself is not today’s topic. Rosie O’Donnell’s influential advocacy role as a loving caregiver to someone with autism is our topic.

rosiebarron

Question: Name someone – anyone – who can elicit a passionate reply from our soon-to-be Commander-in-Chief? Is O’Donnell at the top of your list, after crossing-out (untrustworthy) media sources?

I appeal to O’Donnell’s love for her daughter on behalf of 3.5 million United States citizens living with autism. Use your advocacy skills, love, and Trump’s attention to start a non-confrontational discussion about autism. People will (and already have) listen to you. You’ve more ways to continue said campaign than most readers’ resources pooled together.

Everything lives forever on the internet, so I caution O’Donnell from referring to any child’s possible health concerns without parental or their own consent. This admonition includes referencing Barron Trump, too. I believe O’Donnell is: 1) NOT a certified medical professional trained to diagnose autism, 2) NOT Barron Trump’s physician, and 3) WANTING to start a positive autism discussion at the highest political level in our land. Therefore, I lament her willingness to make an armchair diagnosis about any person’s kid, especially without their consent or desire for such benevolent inquiries. Within the autism community, we fight against neurotypical stereotypes, and these include “symptoms” others may see for less than thirty seconds. Like fast food, social media gives us a flash of reality and expects us to digest it just as easily as a legitimate source of nourishment.

Instead, I offer to walk with O’Donnell along her autism journey. I invite her to chat with me, and I’m sure she will if motivated. I also call upon her to do some positive things about advocacy. Follow me.

Step One:

Acknowledge social problems experienced by persons living with autism. These include abysmal statistics in unemployment, underemployment, long-term housing, medical insurance coverages, and educational material. Until meaningful accommodations are met, persons with autism will be seen as social bottom-feeders beyond the playground. Will you please address this problem, Ms. O’Donnell?

Step Two:

May I call you “Rosie,” please? All of this “Ms. O’Donnell” language seems far too terse when we speak of compassionate service.

Step Three (This is a BIG One!):

Join me in lifting the autism-community boycott of Autism Speaks. Since the passing of co-founder Suzanne Wright, Autism Speaks seems poised to lead by mindful education. Else, they may feel compelled to return to fear-mongering and perpetuating myths about autism. New leaders deserve a chance – isn’t this what President Obama said? Let’s align ourselves with Autism Speaks as the largest U.S. Autism-centered non-profit organization. Obviously, our boycotts did not work, but we do have their attention. Are we willing to be as accepting of others (including new people who lead Autism Speaks) as we claim we want other people to be of us?

Step Four:

Buy a copy of Face Value Comics. Actually, get it for free, here: http://www.drivethrucomics.com/product/124765/Face-Value-Comics

Two years ago, I opted to remove financial constraints from people interested in our comic book. As the world’s first comic book to explicitly feature a hero with autism, we got a lot of attention. We won international awards and enjoy a world-wide audience. Our inclusion of facial feature recognition earned us a positive review in an accredited medical journal as an educational and therapeutic enterprise; we’re the only comic book to be reviewed in a medical journal, too. Pay what you want.

Step Five:

Please, call me Dave. When I hear “David,” I look for my mother, who is likely going to yell at me for something I (probably) did.

Step Six:

Join us in our grass-roots advocacy. We’re just everyday people, but we self-published a unique comic book. We’ve been on the NBC Nightly News, medical journals, and have spoken to the PA and US Congress about autism as subject-matter experts. We would welcome you to share this advocacy spotlight, because I fatigue easily due to my own health challenges (including autism).

In April 2017, in Philadelphia, we debut our latest comic book for fans. As we finish editing and storyboards, we welcome your input into how autism might be portrayed. We seek clear understandings, and to maintain our family-friendly content. You started a serious conversation- will you continue? Do you need or want our help? Have you ever been to a Comic Book Convention as a fan?

Step Seven:

Continue the conversation. I have other strategies we can discuss about positive autism advocacy and acceptance. I also have several Trump-focused Tweets suitable for sharing, that further push this agenda. Otherwise, fans and myself risk seeing you as a fair-weathered advocate for equality and human rights, choosing how and when to stand up or give up based on convenience. Autism is a life-long diagnosis and challenge; will your advocacy, compassion, and interest extend as far?

My requests may take some time to ponder. Contacting me may take time. Let’s decide to chat again in a week, okay? Rosie – please visit and follow us on Facebook, (https://www.facebook.com/FaceValueComics/?ref=bookmarks) or on Twitter (https://twitter.com/FaceValueComics), and send us a message.

Be well,

Dave Kot, an adult with autism and co-parent to a lovely young lady with autism

Autism Awareness? Acceptance? Need Your Help!

Within the autism community, we continually seek more awareness about autism. We hope that with enough awareness, we can forge meaningful relationships based on acceptance. A third prong on the autism advocacy trident is often associated with both or either point: complaining. Understandably, we have no representation within democratic government, we have watered-down educational standards in public education, and our general public remains afraid and ignorant of autism. At a comic book convention, one fan bravely asked if he could contract autism by shaking my hand. Surely, we have lots of work to do to promote autism awareness and acceptance.

What if you could contribute to raising MORE autism awareness? Would you? What if the financial price for the support cost you no additional money (unless you felt philanthropic)? What if the associated time cost you less than an hour?

What if you could contribute to raising MORE autism acceptance? Would you? What if you could raise BOTH autism awareness AND acceptance by doing ONE action? “Wait, Dave-” you cry out; “I’m stuck at home after a blizzard!” If you can read this blog post online, you can also contribute to positive autism advocacy from the safety and warmth of your own home. Will you?

Here’s how you can help: “buy” a comic book. Specifically, buy the world’s first featured comic book hero with autism, written by an autistic adult. Profits from the comic book help pay for future printings of the comic book. However, I personally believe that our comic book can bring a lot of value. Therefore, I do not want an MSRP to be a barrier for some families in financial need. So, last year, I set the digital copy of Issue #1 as a “Pay What You Want” price. Most people donate $2.00 USD for 36 pages of content without advertising (comparable to a mass-produced, 24-page comic book, with 25%+ advertisements, at a similar price evaluation), but you can choose whatever amount you like. You can ever donate AFTER your digital download of Issue #1, here:

http://www.drivethrucomics.com/product/124765/Face-Value-Comics?src=slider_view

For over two years, we stand atop the Top Ten “Hottest Comics” without a staff review. Trust me- I’ve asked for a professional review from the world’s oldest digital comic book store. Will YOU review the comic book? Will you have anything positive to say about the comic book?

It’s a far cry to proclaim how being a top-selling comic book promotes autism advocacy.

To that accusation, I’ll ask you if any other comic book and its creator were featured on the nation’s largest news network. Yes, Disney/Marvel Comics debuted an African-American as Captain America, and a female lead-character named Thor. How is their diversity campaign going? Do you think we will see Steve Rogers don his iconic shield for the next Avengers movie, or will it be Sam Wilson? What about Thor- will SHE be on the big screen anytime soon? These stories made headlines, but were driven by one of the largest businesses in the world. By comparison, I am just a guy.

Maybe you missed out on our inclusion in an accredited medical journal? Spiderman and Superman have NEVER been referenced in a medical journal of any academic merit. Ours is the first comic book to be reviewed by professionals for a medical journal. Last year, we were also inducted into the National Museum of Disability History for our comic books. Some people may do well to take seriously something as simple as a comic book.

Maybe you don’t understand the science behind the comic book, with all fantasy situations aside. Instead, I refer to facial feature recognition. “Wait a minute, that idea of emotional self-regulation seems familiar.” It should- Golden Globe Award Winning “Inside Out” showcased emotional recognition based on the E-X-A-C-T same science we use. My role model- Dr. Paul Ekman- developed facial feature recognition as a non-verbal, multicultural taxonomy to learn more about how others may feel. He consulted on “Inside Out.” Disney/Marvel could not easily market a comic book about facial feature recognition so soon after our lauded attention, so they made a movie. Our main character’s last name is “Eckman.” Some of the top comic book business people follow our blog and social media. Also, several prominent self-advocates follow us. While I’m a fan of the X-Files’ conspiracy theories, I suggest how none of these ideas are a mere coincidence. We’ve tapped into a different, non-traditional way to reach children with autism and those who care for them…and important people take notice. Do you?

Question: Do you remember all of the people who changed their Facebook profiles in support of __________ (fill in the blank)? Do they still support __________ (fill in the blank)? Let’s face it- support can be a long and tiring struggle. I’m not asking you to wade through the trenches with me; I’m asking you to be a part of social capitalism. With more sales – even at $0.00 – we send a message to the marketplace that something GOOD about autism is worth our money and time. Medical doctors already understand the educational and therapeutic value our comic books can provide. Educators meet with us this spring to formalize special resources for better emotional (self) regulation, without raising taxes. Kids and their loved ones helped propel us to one of the most successful, independently published comic book in history.

…or will it be easier for you to sip coffee from your mug emblazoned with a puzzle piece? Support autism advocacy by downloading Issue #1, here:

http://www.drivethrucomics.com/product/124765/Face-Value-Comics?src=slider_view

 

Autism Awareness – Meet the World's 1st Comic Book Hero with Autism!