INVULNERABILITY – a new social superpower

On social media, and by some good friends, I’ve been asked to simplify my angered comments about Marvel Comics’ newest diverse character, a gay Iceman.

 

Marvel Comics is in a large business to sell stories.

 

Name one thing that Iceman has done in fifty years. He’s also been a part of SIX movies. Go ahead- name one thing that distinguishes Iceman as a hero.

 

We wouldn’t accept a politician whose only platform was their sexual identity. Without a proven track record, we would see through this politician for what they really were- table scraps given to pacify voters and secure a demographic.

 

Marvel Comics lists Iceman as being an “Omega” level mutant. This label makes him one of the most powerful members of the X-Men team, if not one of the most powerful heroes  on the planet! Of course, all of us can recall times where Iceman used his phenomenal powers to fix climate change/global warming, stop nuclear wars, and make a snow cone, right?

 

Iceman wasn’t first Marvel Comics character to showcase diversity. We’ve seen changes to other popular characters in the past few months. In fact, these changes were so radical that the new incarnations were exact opposites from their counterparts. Without needing to cite which demographics match these characters, focus more about the lawsuit brought against Marvel Comics by the original creator.

 

Do you remember a television show called KNIGHT RIDER, with David Hasselhoff? Do you remember his talking car, KITT? Let’s pretend that their production studios were sued by a writer. To avoid the lawsuit, they re-painted KITT the opposite color for which he was popularly known. Is that racist? No, but we’re talking about cars and not people. If we change the color or gender of a character for no reason other than to avoid a lawsuit, what kind of story telling do we have? Sure, the background for the new Captain America might be compelling. I cannot overcome my knowledge that a lawsuit prompted the change, not benevolence or good-intentions. If I am wrong, than Marvel Comics will keep their new Thor and Captain America characters for longer than one year. If they abandon these characters, then we affirm the changes was not prompted by good storytelling or benevolence, but to avoiding a lawsuit, under the guise of diversity.

 

When DC revisited their Batgirl title last year, they set a high benchmark. A lot of publicity aired about their new female-friendly writing team. We got to see their entire Batgirl creative team enjoy the new mission ahead through social media. This preparation lent legitimacy about their claims of wanting a new, socially-responsible character. Since DC (and Marvel) are in the business to sell us stories, they wrapped-up Batgirl with a nice bow. Batgirl wasn’t in the middle of a lawsuit by her original creator. Her change seemed legitimate. We saw their efforts, and bought-in.

 

Go ahead- name one thing that individually distinguishes Iceman as a hero in the last fifty years, aside from his bravery to admit sexual identity confusions. This is lazy storytelling. Their creators put more effort into obfuscation and politically-correct strawmen than making a believable hero. However, if I question their efforts and want more, I unwillingly place a target on my chest as being discriminatory. See- I told you Marvel Comics would want other people to defend their token gay character for them!

 

Iceman could be a role model to a lot of readers. Now he only really has a label. I am saddened by this reality. Tell a better story, Marvel Comics – please! You are in the business of selling us stories. Why did you only make Iceman relevant for his sexual identity? I find this gesture like one of pity- why can’t Iceman be a real superhero with awesome abilities and good deeds to make him worthy to roster among the X-Men (if you don’t kill off more characters to spite 20th Century Fox)? You slap a label on him, but this trick won’t be enough for fans to accept him as a title-worthy hero. We’re searching for diversity. You write stories. Write us a story about real diversity, one in which we can believe. You’ve got a good start, so please don’t let it fall away like you’ve done in the past, Marvel Comics.
I submit a new superpower for Bobby Drake: invulnerability to public criticism about how well his character is written and portrayed.

One thought on “INVULNERABILITY – a new social superpower”

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s