EFFECTIVE AUTISM (SELF) ADVOCACY, PART ONE

Being an effective autism (self) advocate means we hope for positive change. With streaming videos and other social media links, a deluge of often negative information floods our minds. In our online community, we also balance things like:
Our boss’ impossible deadline and another night of overtime work at the office;
Providing a nutritious dinner despite a new aversion to cooked vegetables or the color yellow;
Helping an educator understand how “inclusion” means more than sharing the same cafeteria; and
Seasonal allergies or Uncle Robert’s sudden appendectomy.
In this series of weekly blog posts, I want to teach you things I’ve learned – and continue to learn – along my journey with autism. I’m going to show you how to survive and thrive as an advocate. Following my easy progressive steps, you will become a BEAST!

Be an Effective Advocate with Social Temperance

A computer performs massive calculations, but we wouldn’t call a computer an accountant. Likewise, “being” something requires a mindset and more than just actions.
Loaded on alcohol or anger, we could make ourselves loudly heard. Would this be an effective way to share our messages?
We live among other people with very diverse backgrounds. Even with an autism diagnosis, one person’s autism may manifest differently than another similarly-diagnosed person. We must consider many social perspectives, including (and especially) ideas different than our own experiences.
Show compassion and mindfulness to our neighbors. Most of the problems surrounding autism advocacy are ones of ignorance, not intentional malfeasance. We must temper our actions and responses with intelligence and peace to accomplish more good works.
Before we begin BEAST training, please mindfully rest if you find yourself feeling like “T.H.I.S.:”

⌧ Tired
⌧ Hungry
⌧ Irritated
⌧ Sick

These multicultural, nonverbal biological needs demand our attention. First and foremost, effective autism advocacy must help ensure safety. We wouldn’t try to balance our checkbook while vomiting, or mow the lawn at 3:00 AM to cure insomnia. Likewise, we cannot be effective BEASTs without respecting our own mental and physical health needs.
When we feel like “T.H.I.S.,” we enter potentially-trying situations under compromise. Feeling like T.H.I.S., we cannot be compassionate nor receptive to other points of view while our eyes droop or our stomach growls. Take care of these needs, and return to the fight for dignity, respect, and rights on Thursday, for Part Two of BEAST training…
Finally, I know (and partially expect) some readers will creatively rearrange the THIS acronym into something much more memorable about feeling emotionally, mentally, and physically fatigued. Enjoy freedom of speech yet remember a shared audience of younger BEASTs, too.
I addressed my father’s recent heart attack and surgery and my terribly-timed laptop crash. Now, I rededicate myself to autism education, autism employment, autism housing, autism service transitioning…
I will be an autism BEAST!

ARE YOU FOLLOWING US?
If there is another comic book that was positively reviewed in a medical journal for its educational and therapeutic merit, please let us know! Face Value Comics appears in the the Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders medical journal earlier this year.

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