EFFECTIVE AUTISM (SELF) ADVOCACY, PART TWO

B.E.A.S.T. Training, Part 2

Most online autism advocacy resources provide basic information about autism and/or links to connect with social service providers.

My blog post identifies the most important resource for your loved one (or yourself) with autism:

YOU.

Nobody else can easily adopt your role with the never-ending compassion, hope, and love you hold. No artificially-inserted, government-appointed care provider will be as invested as you. We must better address the needs of front-line defenders to ensure the longevity of autism (self) advocacy. Today, I cannot tell you the BEST autism resource link. I offer no cures for autism. I will only tell you what works best for my family and me: self-care.

Do you feel safe? How can we expect great strides in advocacy or development without this basic human survival need in place?

Do you feel wanted, welcomed, or loved by somebody? How can we expect good outcomes without love guiding our decisions?

Do you feel successful? How can we expect to move forward if we feel trapped or overwhelmed?

We cannot be effective autism (self) advocates without sharpening our SaWS: SAfe, Wanted, Successful. These three feelings will unconsciously direct our advocacy efforts.

Here are some culturally-biased examples:

I doubt any American would have written about lion poaching on September 12, 2001. Americans needed to feel safe before advocating for anything else.

I doubt many writers would have written about school-based inclusion during World War II. We needed to feel welcomed and valued before advocating for anything else.

I doubt any American would write about college tuition or lending reform challenges before their teenage child with autism learns to read. We need to recognize and appreciate successes in any form in order to build future successes.

Let’s be better autism advocates by sharpening our SaWS.

Let’s agree to be kind to each other. We can create a positive social change by leading with solid examples. Please consider these ideas for use whenever you feel ready. Some examples have stages of accomplishment to match a busier schedule.

Fire Chief Faust, from Face Value Comics
Fire Chief Faust, from Face Value Comics

CALL TO ACTION:

This weekend, check and/or replace the batteries in your home smoker detector. Charge or re-charge a household fire extinguisher. Inventory your baking soda or flour for accidental grease fires. Draw a map of our home with realistic exits and meeting places for an emergency. Identify any potential barriers that sensory-processing challenges may present to an alarm, new sights, new smells, etc. Consider contacting your local fire fighting teams and introducing your family and addressing their special needs. Practice a family fire drill with escape times under ten minutes, then five minutes, then as fast as you can safely escape and meet together.

These collective steps help build a safe environment. These activities help us show our love and value of other people in our family and community. These suggestions, at whatever piece you can complete, build real successes about our future hopes and plans. These ideas help us

Be Effective Advocates with Social Temperance: Be a BEAST!


ARE YOU FOLLOWING US?

This week, members of our non-profit organization met with the collective body of Police Chiefs in York County, PA. With our friend Trish IIeraci from Providing Relief for Autistic Youth, we offered our local policing authorities additional training about autism (and facial feature recognition). We want our community to appreciate, not fear, its autism residents. Can you name any other comic book team who met and helped advise county police chiefs about autism?

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