Category Archives: Autism Spectrum Condition

Wanna Make a Comic Book? My Invite, Please RSVP

Are you                Yup, I’ve whitewashed this blog post with a secret message! We’re going

Ready?                 to play a game, too. What kind of game? Well, I already gave you a clue…

Grab your pencils, and let’s do this thing!

Have you ever seen a white raven? If you saw a dozen ravens, how many would be white? 100 ravens? 1000 ravens? Hempel’s Paradox highlights problems of understanding based on faulty observations. In turn, these observations skew our perception of reality. Despite our best efforts, you and I are unlikely to see an albino white raven living in the wild, but they DO exist.

Like the Spanish Inquisition, nobody expects a white raven.

I want to change this social perception. Pffft- I know next to nothing about birds, though. I do, however, have personal and professional understandings about autism, mental health, and comic books. In hindsight, that’s an odd set of tools, huh?

If you have autism or mental health challenges, YOU are my audience. I contend few of us are published artists or writers. When I wrote a simple comic book, I received a disproportionate amount of media and scientific attention. In my mind, writing a comic book as an autistic adult shouldn’t have been international news. I was a white raven in the minds of too many people.

Since it’s Autism Awareness Month, I want to acknowledge how many of us need and still seek positive affirmations from family, friends, loved ones, and society in general. One way we may accomplish this is to do something spectacular and unexpected.

Let’s make a comic book(s) together.

(As much as my health permits me,) This week, I’ll be posting some submission guidelines. First, I want to make something crystal clear: I don’t care about an “official” diagnosis. I won’t be asking you for health or insurance information to “prove” yourself. I like you just as you as are, and encourage you to be your best self. Be kind. Be mindful. Be well-read. Be considerate of others’ points-of-view.

My goal is to help build up the confidence and self-worth (not ephemeral ‘self-esteem’) of the next generation of comic book artists and writers. To this end, I’m proposing a comic book anthology of short stories made by our audience at Face Value Comics. Our team will provide editing advice, tips to overcome writers’ block, and content suggestions for no financial charge. I envision a comic book of ?? pages, with art and stories by other “white ravens.” I want the unseen to be seen. I want those of us with autism and mental health to grow as budding professionals deserving of recognition for our talents and attempts. We acknowledge how comic books are a multi-million dollar industry so our collective efforts may become more than idle busy work.

So, is this something of which you’d like to be a part? Please openly share this message with other social media channels. We welcome input and content from like-minded friends. The world already knows me. Let’s use this recognition to open doors for other new talents.

Oh- here’re my initial thoughts of the project:

  1. Pick a real-life historical “culture.” Examples may include, but are not limited to- British Knights, Celts and Vikings, Aztecs, Maori, Maasai, and more. How “historic” is historic? How about this idea: a high school student should be able to write an informative research paper about this group with citational references. In other words, don’t give knights laser guns (yet).
  2. Pick a fictional challenger(s) found in classic literature. Again, some examples include dinosaurs, robots, ninjas, aliens, pirates, vampires, etc. NOTE: “Zombies” are not found in the classic literature; they’re out of scope for this project. Sorry, not sorry- ask Kirkman if he’s doing anything like we propose, if zombies are your groove.
  3. All content must fall under suggestions found for PG-rated movies.
  4. Our team will assemble a good sampling of the content, based on artists’ attention to the initial directions (above). Submissions will fall under ONE PAGE, TWO PAGES, and FOUR PAGES of sequential comic book art.
  5. Next, we invite writers. They will interpret the visual art and craft a story based around it so our heroes win and tell a good story. Again, we will provide editing, suggestions, etc. free of charge.
  6. We’ll collect these stories into an anthology comic book graphic novel and release it as professionally-published content.
  7. “Compensation” and financial discussions must wait- that topic deserves its own post. Actually, so do most of these initial guidelines. Well, at least you know what’s coming later this week, eh?

I’ve been told to mention that Face Value Comics is a registered 501(c)3 non-profit organization; we can accept donations. I’m leery of this point, though; I won’t be bullied into publishing someone’s content based on a financial donation.

Today, my doctor gave me some not-good news. Rather than whine or beg for sympathy, I ask for your help to distract me from it. Let’s fight social stigmas. Together, let’s make something magical and build stronger skills…to show ourselves to the world how we are MORE than our diagnostic labels.

I hope the world stops defining me/us by what I am NOT, but rather who I AM.

TL;DR: I’m inviting persons with autism and mental health challenges to help make an anthology of short comic book stories.

Autism, Steampunk, and Comic Books – An Invitation into My World

March 28th, 2017 is an especially happy day for me.

Someone very special to me celebrates their birthday!

Today is the 25th anniversary of Christian Laettner’s Shot. #sorrynotsorry

ZekeZapAs March closes, our team invite our fans to consider Captain Zeke Zap of Face Value Comics.

Captain Zeke Zap loves his steampunk aerial drones. As leader of the para-military group, “E-Z Squad”, Cap’n Zap employs different drones for combat, communication, and spying. The Blind Blaster of Blue Fox Bay uses kinetic energy created by drone movement to see through his cybernetic-like eyes.

For example, I asked our artist, Sky Owens, to create a special drone for our comic book story. I described this drone as having a pint-sized canister of pressurized helium. Add legs/wheels for eventual landing balance. Place a boxy Victorian camera atop the canister. Position small propellers at each corner, and an inflatable balloon in the center. As remote control levers flip, propellers move and direct this drone. Pressurized gas inflates the balloon and gives it height, and cause propeller blades to spin as the gas circulates through different hoses and valves. Captain Zap can “see” what the camera lens sees as it moves (but not while this drone is stationary), using “bio-kinetic” energy. Add a small megaphone to the drone body, or create another drone for a separate source of information.

Can you imagine this drone, and how it could be used in the Victorian steampunk era? Can you do better? Sky’s artistic interpretation will appear in an upcoming issue…

Would you, or someone you love with autism, want to be part of our creative comic book experiences?

Using the information suggestion table below, decide your level of skill. Also note: we won’t need documentation nor verification of an autism diagnosis; we use an honor system for possible submissions.

SKILL LEVEL ART WRITING
Beginner Can draw/ink/color a steampunk drone. Can verbally and logically describe an aerial drone that seems plausible during the Victorian steampunk era.
Intermediate …in a scene with implied action(s) where this drone and Zeke Zap are featured. …with interesting sci-fi twists regarding its functionality, purpose, use, consequences, relationship with Zeke Zap, etc.
Advanced …and build upon cause-and-effect relationships of the steampowered drone functions in a series of sequential art. …and artful direct scenes of sequential art that incorporates and features Captain Zap and this new drone.

This invitation may spark many questions from our fans. Based on the number of inquiries, we are prepared to continue the conversation about including autistic-created fan art in future publications. Furthermore, we may explore mentoring potential autistic talent in the comic book creation business.

For now, consider your skill levels. Practice. Read (free) guides on drawing and storytelling. Let your imagination soar. This sample direction (see table, above) serves as suggestions. Again, based on fan inquiries about this opportunity, we will discuss submission guidelines throughout April 2017.

At worst, you’ve something to do on a rainy day. At best, we will help mentor new talent with the community’s help. Please save submissions until we set a definitive date; all submissions received before a designated date will not be considered for legal reasons. (I was told I had to write that last line. –Dave)

What questions do you have?

Autism (Self) Advocacy = Best Advocacy

I want our social media to be a safe place for persons living with autism. Here, I want to discuss comic books, education sciences, safety, and self-worth. My goal is to offer hope by invoking these topics, and providing positive examples.

Autism advocacy must evolve, because society always changes. However, our path forward seems foggy. In our household, we have two individuals with two different expressions of autism. Aside from kindness, love, and patience, “autism advocacy” will mean many different things under our roof.

Therefore, I am shifting my focus about autism advocacy. I will begin more self-advocacy and self-disclosure. You are invited along for my journey. These experiences will unfold in future blog posts, videos, and comic books.

An important and lengthy telephone call helped cement this direction. Talking with our artist, Sky Owens, he posed an important question: do we want Face Value Comics to be a socio-political soapbox, or a kid-friendly story about a hero like themselves? Why would an autistic person choose our comic book over any other title? Readers expect comic book stylized action sequences, so what abilities, motivations, or personality makes the Zephyr a hero to kids with autism?

As we expand our comic book line, these questions help remind me of my original goal: kids need heroes like themselves. This means curbing my own misguided self-righteousness against any number of specific social ills. Instead, larger and more relatable arcs can be represented.

In future blog posts, I will likely ask very candid questions. Make no mistake: I seek thoughtful answers, not conspiracy theories, political rhetoric, circular answers, nor “alternative facts.” With some questions, I will certainly appear unintelligent. I am. The longer I fight for autism (self) advocacy, the more I realize how much I do not understand. Aren’t some problems with autism tied to misunderstanding unwritten social expectations?

Our world changes daily. Information doubles exponentially. How do we juggle real life demands while being autism advocates? I submit self-care and self-advocacy are our best achievements. At the end of each day, being our best selves is the best form of advocacy anyone can do. I cannot address nor imagine what your “best self” is; only you and your loved ones can help. As for me, I ask you to follow me as I (re)explore autism self-advocacy. Together, we can learn. Together, we can be equals, knowing we try our best to be our best.

myra-z2

We’ve finished twelve pages of our next comic book. We have clear examples of emotive facial expressions, villains coded by color gradients (“Cool” colors = good; “Warm” colors = bad), PG-graded action/combat situations, steampunk imagery, and heroic endings (or cliffhangers). We anticipate a release this spring, and will continue to keep our fans apprised of news.

Welcome, Betsy “The Boss” Devos

January 19, 2017

Betsy Devos’ nomination and (likely) confirmation as Secretary of Education ushers in a new era of autism advocacy. Many autism advocates malign Ms. Devos’ inexperience, lucrative political campaign contributions, and misunderstanding of IDEA. However, I welcome these obvious flaws to a candidate overseeing (autism) education. History is on our side. Specifically, I point to:

Brown v Board of Education, and the power of litigation to redress social disjunction.

To be clear, nobody really “wins” any lawsuit. Presumed damages have occurred, we resurrect painful memories in court, and lots of money goes to shark lawyers. What other options might we have before filing suit?

Ask Hillary Clinton the value of popular votes in an election.

Ask #BlackLivesMatter how many African-Americans still suffer police brutality.

Ask Planned Parenthood how well 78,000 signatures persuaded the Speaker of the House.

I believe our advances for inclusive education, employment, healthcare and housing will fall flat if we plan to reinvent broken wheels. I’ll invoke the definition of “insanity” and compare our advocacy techniques to other failed examples. We need a new approach under a new political administration. Having obviously-flawed candidates, like Devos, helps us.

By his own words, President Trump does not understand autism. I doubt Devos understands autism, based on her confusion about IDEA. We’ve no openly-autistic representative in Congress- none. If we believe billionaires lead our county, we must also accept how well they fear and know the word, “lawsuit.” Many build and protect their fortune and influence on this word.

If we cannot have discussions about autism with autistic leaders, we must use language our leaders know. “Charity?” “Compassion?” “Empathy?” “Inclusion?” Do these words best describe Trump or his Education nominee? We may as well speak Japanese to them, but we have history on our side to invoke business terms. “Lawsuit” means action.

I’m waiting for 2017’s autism-based version of Brown v Board of Education. This is how we slay the giants of misunderstanding- one, well placed lawsuit to destroy their credibility and strip them of misguided power. We strike a blow against their fortune now and in the future; will organizations readily side with someone named in a SCOTUS lawsuit? My approach is non-violent, doesn’t require a large following, leapfrogs media value, and is multicultural in acceptance and execution. We skip what has been tried, and has failed. If we’ve had the presumably best advocates before Devos, I question the quality of our advocacy today. Devos gives us the best recourse for positive change if she doesn’t do a good job. If she fails us, like many suspect, I’ve outlined a peaceable solution using the foul language of the Economic Elite.

Please, give us Devos. I hope she does an excellent job. If not, you call your Congressional representative; I’ll call a (fame-and-fortune seeking) lawyer, of which there are more than Congressional representatives. Which phone call will affect the most positive outcome? Which call will force change? Which call will make Devos shake in her Pradas?

Prophetic Autism and 2017 Goals

Face Value Comics cannot be your ‘opus,’ because it suggests you’ve nothing more to give.

My wife, Angela, shared her hopes for me as 2016 closed. In this blog update, I want to share more goals with you. Will you help keep me accountable for positive autism advocacy?

What content would you like to see from an adult living with autism? Please feel free to review past blog posts, including one where I predicted a loss of civil rights for individuals with autism. Additionally, I outlined a tax-free way to add $1k for autism-based classroom instruction. As a former professional helper, I discussed an airtight strategy that’s been 100% funded by third-party insurances. I shared how facial feature recognition helps me navigate social situations, too.

I also enjoy comic books, including writing script. In 2017, we debut a smaller story and new characters: Quantum X, in Outfox Magazine. Have you subscribed to their autism-friendly publication yet? Here’s our story cover image:

quantun-x-cover
Cover Art for #1 Quantum-X. Fantastic Art by Sky Owens!

However, I also experience some significant health concerns for which I receive professionally-adequate treatments. Despite having nearly three years of script outlined, I cannot remember what or why I wrote what I originally did. Sometimes, I have no memory of many things, so recording my goals helps increase accountability. When I feel too ill to write in depth, I’ll share why, and how I’m trying to overcome a specific challenge.

As we discuss autism, I want to remain positive; edge-lords and trolls need not apply. As I try certain self-improvement goals, I realize how damaging blame and doubt becomes. Instead, let’s remember how everything outlives us on the Internet. Together, we will be a solid leadership resource for increasing autism acceptance. Follow me, and be sure to leave a suggestion for an autism topic in the comments section!

I will write more…next time.

–Dave

Get off Your A$k, Government: Autism Education Reform

Dear Pennsylvanian Congressmen Mike Doyle, Scott Perry, and Seth Grove:

My name is Dave Kot, an autistic constituent living in York, PA. Perhaps you remember me? We met to discuss small business practices, and educational/therapeutic implications behind our internationally-award winning comic book. Now, I offer to help our government during a time of budgetary needs, when special education funding stands at risk.

Maybe I lost your interest with words like “autistic” or “comic book.” Typically, these two things wouldn’t seem complimentary. Certainly, most people would not opt for either adjective as a default prerequisite. Maybe you don’t want my help, and prefer to banter between Governor Tom Wolfe while our state budget – and intended beneficiaries of ear-marked funds – hang in the balance. I ask you to presume greater competence from an adult with autism, and continue reading for a probable solution.

Digital Camera
My apologies for the format of the photograph- I will upload a new picture of the award in the near future, showing its spiffy wood carvings!

This picture shows me holding an international award from Canada, which I received on last week. It recognizes my application of science to assist young readers with autism identify others’ emotions, to improve some social situations. Don’t you find it easier to negotiate with people who smile instead of scorn? Think back- who taught you what anger, or fear, or disgust looked like? Our comic helps readers identify these emotional states by themselves or with help. NBC Nightly News featured this work last year.

However, our non-profit mission goes far beyond comic books. Last year, my scientific application of facial feature recognition was recognized by the academic community. Unsolicited by me, an accredited medical journal (Journal of Autism and Developmental Disabilities) warmly reviewed the comic for my claims and validated my doctorial studies. To my knowledge, ours is the world’s first comic book to be critically reviewed by unbiased third parties for inclusion in a medical journal.

Do I have your attention, yet? Does it matter that I am also clinically diagnosed with autism (technically, “Asperger’s Syndrome”)? Do years of graduate and post-graduate work matter? Do several international awards and prominent global grass-roots leaders within my circles matter? Does inclusion in a medical journal matter? If none of these things matter to you, I lay my ‘trump’ card (no relation):

Join us. I’ve developed fantastic relationships. This spring, the Dover Area School District Supervisor (Kenneth Cherry) and Supervisor of Special Education (Dave Depew) and our team will meet. We will begin formulating special needs curriculum using the exact same scientific theory about which I wrote. Does this invitation interest you? How about now, Congressmen:

Last spring, the Dover Areas School District School Board unanimously voted to adopt facial feature recognition (read: the science behind our comics) as part of its special needs classroom initiative. Some people may think, “…what does that vote have to do with me?”

Expert analysis by people I consider smarter than myself predict how implementation of facial feature recognition could be used to GAIN about $1,000 to $1,500 PER classroom PER district PER year. Would you like to know how? This answer will require an in-depth presentation of materials, like my wife and I offered the Dover Area School District. Suffice to say, this net increase to special education can occur without adding ONE cent to the typical taxpayer, and insulates itself against future federal or state budget changes or cuts. Over time, analysis suggests how Dover Area School District will be the first school district able to offer graduating students with special needs a tax-free grant for further education or other personal costs. Imagine- just by implementing my well-vetted research, we could offer a high school senior money for college textbooks, or a new suit for job interviews, etc. We also push school choice by offering competitive education.

Would you prefer to affect positive change for students and families with special education needs, or do you prefer the political stalemate and barbs between yourselves and Governor Tom Wolfe? Please make no mistake- I am largely non-political and don’t care who gets credit for this work. We can and should share in good news, regardless of political affiliation. However, things could be done faster with Pennsylvania’s Congress (and the U.S. Congressional Autism Congress?) in tune with this proposed goal, to replicate it wherever it may be useful.

Congressmen, I invite you to witness scientific, economical, and educational change poised to happen under your watch in your respective areas of governance. I thank you for your assistance in my business matters, your praise for my work as an adult with autism, and now offer to pay it forward to help our community and state. Will you accept my invitation and lay down rhetoric for real change? Will you trust a person with autism who offers valid options for change? In closing, I’ll simply invoke the name of Temple Grandin- a fellow academic professional with autism whose autism allowed her to see things differently and whose courage changed an entire way of business. I am not Temple Grandin, but I am Dave Kot. I can help you help Pennsylvanian and United States’ special education programs.

Please continue the discussion via this social media source, or email us at: Angie@FaceValue.US

Thank you for your time and interest, and Happy New Year!

Be well,

Dave Kot

Autism, Tragedy Takes No Holidays

 

By now, you may have learned about the tragic outcome of a nationally-broadcast search. On New Year’s Eve, a five year-old boy with autism went wandering from a family home. At your own comfort, at your own time, read more about the story, here: http://ow.ly/WydPq

I am very sad, and rather inconsolable at the moment. I do not have words to express my sympathy. Instead, I will try to do what I do best: teach.

If I were wealthy, I could throw money at the problem. If I were a politician, I could probably make some radical promises to ensure future safety. Since I am neither of these things, I may have limited options. Fear may guide my decisions. Instead, I will teach.

Tomorrow, I will host a family fire drill in our home. I suppose I could research a lot of different resources and find a spiffy worksheet, but I opt for raw emotion in real time.

FIRE DRILL PREPARATION

  1. Coordinate. With my partner, we will schedule a time for our family fire drill. Together, we will inform our neighbors, as to raise awareness and reduce panic. I’ll also place small traffic cones in our neighborhood, in hopes of reducing speedy passers-by.
  2. Preview the Activity. About an hour before the scheduled event, we will review casual terms of fire safety with the family. These things would include what a smoke detector sounds like, how to escape a hot/smoky room, and where to collectively meet. We will prompt correct answers, and build confidence.
  3. Hold the Family Fire Drill. At the planned time, we set-off the smoke detector, and time our exit.
  4. Review. After the fire drill, we will sit down with hot chocolate (hey, it’s going to be cold tomorrow) and discuss why we did things the way we did. Ask for input from the family. Learn their comfort levels and try to reduce anxiety. Reinforce how proud we are of the kids to manage their own safety. Since these safety drills can inspire fear, we will reduce this anxiety by playing a family game or similar bonding activities. My partner and I must instill faith and trust in our ability to lead during a family crisis, like a real-life fire/smoke emergency.
  5. Read visitor comments to this blog post. I will continually edit this document with accredited sources. Thank you for reading this update.

I’m quite certain this list looks more like a rough draft, and I probably missed some key points. Feel free to suggest other things we could do as a family, but I simply ask you first…

PLEASE COMPLETE YOUR OWN HOME FIRE/SMOKE DRILL BEFORE COMMENTING ON MINE. Then, please advise.

I refuse to allow fear-mongering about autism, despite this tragic story. We must be motivated by hope, and find some measure of control within ourselves. These are the best way to insulate against fear: learning and empowerment.

 

New Year Autism Opportunities

Happy New Year! One of my personal/professional goals was to read more new theories about coping with autism. At Christmas, I got a special gift from my friend, Dr. Rob Melillo. He asked me to review his latest book!

I’m humbled and honored by his invitation. Dr. Melillo’s the world’s most-quoted author on neurodevelopmental disorders. Soon, I’ll share my thoughts about “The Disconnected Kids Nutrition Plan” on this blog.

drrob

Instead of bragging, I want to remind our fans how this is a shared journey. Whenever anyone tells you or a loved one – with or without autism – you “can’t” do something you want to do, you’ve an opportunity to positively change their perceptions. I have autism. Because I have some poor social experiences, I lost (too) much in my personal and professional life. We could commiserate for days about autism, but I offer a more productive experiment:

Be the change you want to see in the world,” said Mahatma Gandhi. How do we do this work, to change social opinions about autism? “A journey of a thousand miles begins with one step,” retorts Lao-Tzu. January is rife with planned promises for the future. What will you be doing to help yourself or loved ones feel safer, feel more welcomed and valued, and feel more successful? I’m listening more, reading more, and writing more good stuff.

Join me.

EFFECTIVE AUTISM (SELF) ADVOCACY, PART TWO

B.E.A.S.T. Training, Part 2

Most online autism advocacy resources provide basic information about autism and/or links to connect with social service providers.

My blog post identifies the most important resource for your loved one (or yourself) with autism:

YOU.

Nobody else can easily adopt your role with the never-ending compassion, hope, and love you hold. No artificially-inserted, government-appointed care provider will be as invested as you. We must better address the needs of front-line defenders to ensure the longevity of autism (self) advocacy. Today, I cannot tell you the BEST autism resource link. I offer no cures for autism. I will only tell you what works best for my family and me: self-care.

Do you feel safe? How can we expect great strides in advocacy or development without this basic human survival need in place?

Do you feel wanted, welcomed, or loved by somebody? How can we expect good outcomes without love guiding our decisions?

Do you feel successful? How can we expect to move forward if we feel trapped or overwhelmed?

We cannot be effective autism (self) advocates without sharpening our SaWS: SAfe, Wanted, Successful. These three feelings will unconsciously direct our advocacy efforts.

Here are some culturally-biased examples:

I doubt any American would have written about lion poaching on September 12, 2001. Americans needed to feel safe before advocating for anything else.

I doubt many writers would have written about school-based inclusion during World War II. We needed to feel welcomed and valued before advocating for anything else.

I doubt any American would write about college tuition or lending reform challenges before their teenage child with autism learns to read. We need to recognize and appreciate successes in any form in order to build future successes.

Let’s be better autism advocates by sharpening our SaWS.

Let’s agree to be kind to each other. We can create a positive social change by leading with solid examples. Please consider these ideas for use whenever you feel ready. Some examples have stages of accomplishment to match a busier schedule.

Fire Chief Faust, from Face Value Comics
Fire Chief Faust, from Face Value Comics

CALL TO ACTION:

This weekend, check and/or replace the batteries in your home smoker detector. Charge or re-charge a household fire extinguisher. Inventory your baking soda or flour for accidental grease fires. Draw a map of our home with realistic exits and meeting places for an emergency. Identify any potential barriers that sensory-processing challenges may present to an alarm, new sights, new smells, etc. Consider contacting your local fire fighting teams and introducing your family and addressing their special needs. Practice a family fire drill with escape times under ten minutes, then five minutes, then as fast as you can safely escape and meet together.

These collective steps help build a safe environment. These activities help us show our love and value of other people in our family and community. These suggestions, at whatever piece you can complete, build real successes about our future hopes and plans. These ideas help us

Be Effective Advocates with Social Temperance: Be a BEAST!


ARE YOU FOLLOWING US?

This week, members of our non-profit organization met with the collective body of Police Chiefs in York County, PA. With our friend Trish IIeraci from Providing Relief for Autistic Youth, we offered our local policing authorities additional training about autism (and facial feature recognition). We want our community to appreciate, not fear, its autism residents. Can you name any other comic book team who met and helped advise county police chiefs about autism?

EFFECTIVE AUTISM (SELF) ADVOCACY, PART ONE

Being an effective autism (self) advocate means we hope for positive change. With streaming videos and other social media links, a deluge of often negative information floods our minds. In our online community, we also balance things like:
Our boss’ impossible deadline and another night of overtime work at the office;
Providing a nutritious dinner despite a new aversion to cooked vegetables or the color yellow;
Helping an educator understand how “inclusion” means more than sharing the same cafeteria; and
Seasonal allergies or Uncle Robert’s sudden appendectomy.
In this series of weekly blog posts, I want to teach you things I’ve learned – and continue to learn – along my journey with autism. I’m going to show you how to survive and thrive as an advocate. Following my easy progressive steps, you will become a BEAST!

Be an Effective Advocate with Social Temperance

A computer performs massive calculations, but we wouldn’t call a computer an accountant. Likewise, “being” something requires a mindset and more than just actions.
Loaded on alcohol or anger, we could make ourselves loudly heard. Would this be an effective way to share our messages?
We live among other people with very diverse backgrounds. Even with an autism diagnosis, one person’s autism may manifest differently than another similarly-diagnosed person. We must consider many social perspectives, including (and especially) ideas different than our own experiences.
Show compassion and mindfulness to our neighbors. Most of the problems surrounding autism advocacy are ones of ignorance, not intentional malfeasance. We must temper our actions and responses with intelligence and peace to accomplish more good works.
Before we begin BEAST training, please mindfully rest if you find yourself feeling like “T.H.I.S.:”

⌧ Tired
⌧ Hungry
⌧ Irritated
⌧ Sick

These multicultural, nonverbal biological needs demand our attention. First and foremost, effective autism advocacy must help ensure safety. We wouldn’t try to balance our checkbook while vomiting, or mow the lawn at 3:00 AM to cure insomnia. Likewise, we cannot be effective BEASTs without respecting our own mental and physical health needs.
When we feel like “T.H.I.S.,” we enter potentially-trying situations under compromise. Feeling like T.H.I.S., we cannot be compassionate nor receptive to other points of view while our eyes droop or our stomach growls. Take care of these needs, and return to the fight for dignity, respect, and rights on Thursday, for Part Two of BEAST training…
Finally, I know (and partially expect) some readers will creatively rearrange the THIS acronym into something much more memorable about feeling emotionally, mentally, and physically fatigued. Enjoy freedom of speech yet remember a shared audience of younger BEASTs, too.
I addressed my father’s recent heart attack and surgery and my terribly-timed laptop crash. Now, I rededicate myself to autism education, autism employment, autism housing, autism service transitioning…
I will be an autism BEAST!

ARE YOU FOLLOWING US?
If there is another comic book that was positively reviewed in a medical journal for its educational and therapeutic merit, please let us know! Face Value Comics appears in the the Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders medical journal earlier this year.