Tag Archives: Advocacy

Wanna Make a Comic Book? My Invite, Please RSVP

Are you                Yup, I’ve whitewashed this blog post with a secret message! We’re going

Ready?                 to play a game, too. What kind of game? Well, I already gave you a clue…

Grab your pencils, and let’s do this thing!

Have you ever seen a white raven? If you saw a dozen ravens, how many would be white? 100 ravens? 1000 ravens? Hempel’s Paradox highlights problems of understanding based on faulty observations. In turn, these observations skew our perception of reality. Despite our best efforts, you and I are unlikely to see an albino white raven living in the wild, but they DO exist.

Like the Spanish Inquisition, nobody expects a white raven.

I want to change this social perception. Pffft- I know next to nothing about birds, though. I do, however, have personal and professional understandings about autism, mental health, and comic books. In hindsight, that’s an odd set of tools, huh?

If you have autism or mental health challenges, YOU are my audience. I contend few of us are published artists or writers. When I wrote a simple comic book, I received a disproportionate amount of media and scientific attention. In my mind, writing a comic book as an autistic adult shouldn’t have been international news. I was a white raven in the minds of too many people.

Since it’s Autism Awareness Month, I want to acknowledge how many of us need and still seek positive affirmations from family, friends, loved ones, and society in general. One way we may accomplish this is to do something spectacular and unexpected.

Let’s make a comic book(s) together.

(As much as my health permits me,) This week, I’ll be posting some submission guidelines. First, I want to make something crystal clear: I don’t care about an “official” diagnosis. I won’t be asking you for health or insurance information to “prove” yourself. I like you just as you as are, and encourage you to be your best self. Be kind. Be mindful. Be well-read. Be considerate of others’ points-of-view.

My goal is to help build up the confidence and self-worth (not ephemeral ‘self-esteem’) of the next generation of comic book artists and writers. To this end, I’m proposing a comic book anthology of short stories made by our audience at Face Value Comics. Our team will provide editing advice, tips to overcome writers’ block, and content suggestions for no financial charge. I envision a comic book of ?? pages, with art and stories by other “white ravens.” I want the unseen to be seen. I want those of us with autism and mental health to grow as budding professionals deserving of recognition for our talents and attempts. We acknowledge how comic books are a multi-million dollar industry so our collective efforts may become more than idle busy work.

So, is this something of which you’d like to be a part? Please openly share this message with other social media channels. We welcome input and content from like-minded friends. The world already knows me. Let’s use this recognition to open doors for other new talents.

Oh- here’re my initial thoughts of the project:

  1. Pick a real-life historical “culture.” Examples may include, but are not limited to- British Knights, Celts and Vikings, Aztecs, Maori, Maasai, and more. How “historic” is historic? How about this idea: a high school student should be able to write an informative research paper about this group with citational references. In other words, don’t give knights laser guns (yet).
  2. Pick a fictional challenger(s) found in classic literature. Again, some examples include dinosaurs, robots, ninjas, aliens, pirates, vampires, etc. NOTE: “Zombies” are not found in the classic literature; they’re out of scope for this project. Sorry, not sorry- ask Kirkman if he’s doing anything like we propose, if zombies are your groove.
  3. All content must fall under suggestions found for PG-rated movies.
  4. Our team will assemble a good sampling of the content, based on artists’ attention to the initial directions (above). Submissions will fall under ONE PAGE, TWO PAGES, and FOUR PAGES of sequential comic book art.
  5. Next, we invite writers. They will interpret the visual art and craft a story based around it so our heroes win and tell a good story. Again, we will provide editing, suggestions, etc. free of charge.
  6. We’ll collect these stories into an anthology comic book graphic novel and release it as professionally-published content.
  7. “Compensation” and financial discussions must wait- that topic deserves its own post. Actually, so do most of these initial guidelines. Well, at least you know what’s coming later this week, eh?

I’ve been told to mention that Face Value Comics is a registered 501(c)3 non-profit organization; we can accept donations. I’m leery of this point, though; I won’t be bullied into publishing someone’s content based on a financial donation.

Today, my doctor gave me some not-good news. Rather than whine or beg for sympathy, I ask for your help to distract me from it. Let’s fight social stigmas. Together, let’s make something magical and build stronger skills…to show ourselves to the world how we are MORE than our diagnostic labels.

I hope the world stops defining me/us by what I am NOT, but rather who I AM.

TL;DR: I’m inviting persons with autism and mental health challenges to help make an anthology of short comic book stories.

Gearseeker Serpent & Autism Acceptance

What does autism acceptance look like? Will we need a celebrity proclaiming it via social media? Will an elected official – someone who is not autistic – pass legislation mandating said acceptance?

Playing a collectible card game (and my friend, Trav) helped teach me something new about autism acceptance. Please don’t become distracted by too many details of this collectible trading card. Gearseeker Serpent means something to us as autism advocates.

gearseekerserpent

Copyright/Trademark Acknowledgement: Everything about GEARSEEKER SERPENT belongs to Wizards of the Coast, except my interpretation.

Apparently, I can summon this creature faster if I have help; specifically, lots of artifacts lure him into play. I doubt I can play this card on my first turn of the game. How about Turn Two? Is Turn Four reasonable, or too late? I begin to deconstruct the perfect scenario in which I see Gearseeker Serpent devouring my opponent. Now, build to this goal.

Here’s our lesson about autism acceptance, from Gearseeker Serpent:

BEGIN WITH A VISUALIZED GOAL IN MIND.

What is “autism acceptance” to you? What may have happened to encourage others’ acceptance? Will you need help? How much help do you think you’ll need, and when will you need help? Deconstruct the perfect scenario in which you feel most accepted, and identify those incremental steps towards tolerance. Now, built to this goal.

Without specific goal setting, we may lose focus. We might fail to acknowledge necessary early steps towards our goal if we only focus on the END GOAL. Others will liken us to some Greek Myth, whereby we gluttonously demand more acceptance, while ignoring acceptance growing around us, forever self-tormented. Stop demanding global, ephemeral autism “acceptance,” and develop your goals towards that result. Cultivate strategic planning, ask for help, and autism “acceptance” will happen.

Otherwise, Gearseeker Serpent and the weight of unfulfilled should-isms threaten to crush us individually and collectively. Please share your specific examples of autism acceptance goals in the comments, below.

Prophetic Autism and 2017 Goals

Face Value Comics cannot be your ‘opus,’ because it suggests you’ve nothing more to give.

My wife, Angela, shared her hopes for me as 2016 closed. In this blog update, I want to share more goals with you. Will you help keep me accountable for positive autism advocacy?

What content would you like to see from an adult living with autism? Please feel free to review past blog posts, including one where I predicted a loss of civil rights for individuals with autism. Additionally, I outlined a tax-free way to add $1k for autism-based classroom instruction. As a former professional helper, I discussed an airtight strategy that’s been 100% funded by third-party insurances. I shared how facial feature recognition helps me navigate social situations, too.

I also enjoy comic books, including writing script. In 2017, we debut a smaller story and new characters: Quantum X, in Outfox Magazine. Have you subscribed to their autism-friendly publication yet? Here’s our story cover image:

quantun-x-cover
Cover Art for #1 Quantum-X. Fantastic Art by Sky Owens!

However, I also experience some significant health concerns for which I receive professionally-adequate treatments. Despite having nearly three years of script outlined, I cannot remember what or why I wrote what I originally did. Sometimes, I have no memory of many things, so recording my goals helps increase accountability. When I feel too ill to write in depth, I’ll share why, and how I’m trying to overcome a specific challenge.

As we discuss autism, I want to remain positive; edge-lords and trolls need not apply. As I try certain self-improvement goals, I realize how damaging blame and doubt becomes. Instead, let’s remember how everything outlives us on the Internet. Together, we will be a solid leadership resource for increasing autism acceptance. Follow me, and be sure to leave a suggestion for an autism topic in the comments section!

I will write more…next time.

–Dave

EFFECTIVE AUTISM (SELF) ADVOCACY, PART TWO

B.E.A.S.T. Training, Part 2

Most online autism advocacy resources provide basic information about autism and/or links to connect with social service providers.

My blog post identifies the most important resource for your loved one (or yourself) with autism:

YOU.

Nobody else can easily adopt your role with the never-ending compassion, hope, and love you hold. No artificially-inserted, government-appointed care provider will be as invested as you. We must better address the needs of front-line defenders to ensure the longevity of autism (self) advocacy. Today, I cannot tell you the BEST autism resource link. I offer no cures for autism. I will only tell you what works best for my family and me: self-care.

Do you feel safe? How can we expect great strides in advocacy or development without this basic human survival need in place?

Do you feel wanted, welcomed, or loved by somebody? How can we expect good outcomes without love guiding our decisions?

Do you feel successful? How can we expect to move forward if we feel trapped or overwhelmed?

We cannot be effective autism (self) advocates without sharpening our SaWS: SAfe, Wanted, Successful. These three feelings will unconsciously direct our advocacy efforts.

Here are some culturally-biased examples:

I doubt any American would have written about lion poaching on September 12, 2001. Americans needed to feel safe before advocating for anything else.

I doubt many writers would have written about school-based inclusion during World War II. We needed to feel welcomed and valued before advocating for anything else.

I doubt any American would write about college tuition or lending reform challenges before their teenage child with autism learns to read. We need to recognize and appreciate successes in any form in order to build future successes.

Let’s be better autism advocates by sharpening our SaWS.

Let’s agree to be kind to each other. We can create a positive social change by leading with solid examples. Please consider these ideas for use whenever you feel ready. Some examples have stages of accomplishment to match a busier schedule.

Fire Chief Faust, from Face Value Comics
Fire Chief Faust, from Face Value Comics

CALL TO ACTION:

This weekend, check and/or replace the batteries in your home smoker detector. Charge or re-charge a household fire extinguisher. Inventory your baking soda or flour for accidental grease fires. Draw a map of our home with realistic exits and meeting places for an emergency. Identify any potential barriers that sensory-processing challenges may present to an alarm, new sights, new smells, etc. Consider contacting your local fire fighting teams and introducing your family and addressing their special needs. Practice a family fire drill with escape times under ten minutes, then five minutes, then as fast as you can safely escape and meet together.

These collective steps help build a safe environment. These activities help us show our love and value of other people in our family and community. These suggestions, at whatever piece you can complete, build real successes about our future hopes and plans. These ideas help us

Be Effective Advocates with Social Temperance: Be a BEAST!


ARE YOU FOLLOWING US?

This week, members of our non-profit organization met with the collective body of Police Chiefs in York County, PA. With our friend Trish IIeraci from Providing Relief for Autistic Youth, we offered our local policing authorities additional training about autism (and facial feature recognition). We want our community to appreciate, not fear, its autism residents. Can you name any other comic book team who met and helped advise county police chiefs about autism?

EFFECTIVE AUTISM (SELF) ADVOCACY, PART ONE

Being an effective autism (self) advocate means we hope for positive change. With streaming videos and other social media links, a deluge of often negative information floods our minds. In our online community, we also balance things like:
Our boss’ impossible deadline and another night of overtime work at the office;
Providing a nutritious dinner despite a new aversion to cooked vegetables or the color yellow;
Helping an educator understand how “inclusion” means more than sharing the same cafeteria; and
Seasonal allergies or Uncle Robert’s sudden appendectomy.
In this series of weekly blog posts, I want to teach you things I’ve learned – and continue to learn – along my journey with autism. I’m going to show you how to survive and thrive as an advocate. Following my easy progressive steps, you will become a BEAST!

Be an Effective Advocate with Social Temperance

A computer performs massive calculations, but we wouldn’t call a computer an accountant. Likewise, “being” something requires a mindset and more than just actions.
Loaded on alcohol or anger, we could make ourselves loudly heard. Would this be an effective way to share our messages?
We live among other people with very diverse backgrounds. Even with an autism diagnosis, one person’s autism may manifest differently than another similarly-diagnosed person. We must consider many social perspectives, including (and especially) ideas different than our own experiences.
Show compassion and mindfulness to our neighbors. Most of the problems surrounding autism advocacy are ones of ignorance, not intentional malfeasance. We must temper our actions and responses with intelligence and peace to accomplish more good works.
Before we begin BEAST training, please mindfully rest if you find yourself feeling like “T.H.I.S.:”

⌧ Tired
⌧ Hungry
⌧ Irritated
⌧ Sick

These multicultural, nonverbal biological needs demand our attention. First and foremost, effective autism advocacy must help ensure safety. We wouldn’t try to balance our checkbook while vomiting, or mow the lawn at 3:00 AM to cure insomnia. Likewise, we cannot be effective BEASTs without respecting our own mental and physical health needs.
When we feel like “T.H.I.S.,” we enter potentially-trying situations under compromise. Feeling like T.H.I.S., we cannot be compassionate nor receptive to other points of view while our eyes droop or our stomach growls. Take care of these needs, and return to the fight for dignity, respect, and rights on Thursday, for Part Two of BEAST training…
Finally, I know (and partially expect) some readers will creatively rearrange the THIS acronym into something much more memorable about feeling emotionally, mentally, and physically fatigued. Enjoy freedom of speech yet remember a shared audience of younger BEASTs, too.
I addressed my father’s recent heart attack and surgery and my terribly-timed laptop crash. Now, I rededicate myself to autism education, autism employment, autism housing, autism service transitioning…
I will be an autism BEAST!

ARE YOU FOLLOWING US?
If there is another comic book that was positively reviewed in a medical journal for its educational and therapeutic merit, please let us know! Face Value Comics appears in the the Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders medical journal earlier this year.