Tag Archives: Games

Do. You. Want. To. Play. A. Game, Superheroes?

This sentence disappears in my blog. Why?

Happy National Superhero Day! This is the ONE time we can use “superhero” without copyright infringement. Did you know that DC and Marvel Comics jointly share the copyright on a word: “superhero?” Today, I’m teaching you how to use your own new superpower, one that functions like x-ray vision!

Augmented Reality Games (ARGs) are small puzzles built into existing, real-life situations. I find ARGs quite compelling and engaging. In fact, incorporating ARGs into comic book script and online social media now overtakes my Hollywood-like D-List celebrity status as a political hack or sociologist. My success lies in authentic comic book creation, not mobilizing more autistic voters. Personally, I’ve disliked hearing actors or fiction writers tell us how to vote or feel; why am I any different? #Done.

Many people extoll autistic virtues of mathematics and puzzle-solving, so I rightfully seek out our audience to play games with us. As with other entertainment, rewards are often available. Maybe it’s easier to show you how ARGs will work in Face Value Comics going forward. Sit back, grab a soda, and pay attention: I promise you’ll be happily surprised!

 

Punch Page 9
SAMPLE SKETCHES FOR STEAMPUNCH’D #1, pg. 9

 

Imagine robots fighting our comic book hero with autism, The Zephyr. One robot might exclaim, “01001000 01100101 01101100 01110000.” This is simply binary code for “Help!” In other words, I think this Easter Egg is (too) easy for our readers. Instead, I insert ARGs into the script without affecting the story. How? Let’s continue!!

Next, another robot might reply to its partner with a series of new numbers. These numbers may correspond to real-life GPS coordinates. Another robot utters another set of GPS coordinates later in the comic book. Collected together, these “hidden” clues relate to a public park near my home. So far, so good?

In this same comic book issue, readers might otherwise neglect background scenery in Michael’s home. This could include a calendar with a month and date circled. Elsewhere, another character might point to a clock (or, more creatively, “2 o’clock”) as the villain’s bomb timer counts down.

Guess what we did? We just invited ALL of our readers to meet our creative team for hot dogs and ice cream at a local park near my home (for my convenience) at 2:00pm on Month, Date of the publishing year. Welcome to ARGs, or games-within-reality. We’ve already begun to drop clues within blog posts and in script scheduled for the future. Some examples include 12 pages of comic sketches and a t-shirt give-away! These are just examples which I would rate as “beginner” level experience. Search the internet for other ARG examples, including an amazing one played by the band, Tool.

Never judge a book by its cover. This advice applies for/to persons with autism, and now to Face Value Comics. Happy Hunting, Superheroes!!!

P.S. I gave you clues in decoding other hints. We began inserting surprise content no earlier than 2017.

Gearseeker Serpent & Autism Acceptance

What does autism acceptance look like? Will we need a celebrity proclaiming it via social media? Will an elected official – someone who is not autistic – pass legislation mandating said acceptance?

Playing a collectible card game (and my friend, Trav) helped teach me something new about autism acceptance. Please don’t become distracted by too many details of this collectible trading card. Gearseeker Serpent means something to us as autism advocates.

gearseekerserpent

Copyright/Trademark Acknowledgement: Everything about GEARSEEKER SERPENT belongs to Wizards of the Coast, except my interpretation.

Apparently, I can summon this creature faster if I have help; specifically, lots of artifacts lure him into play. I doubt I can play this card on my first turn of the game. How about Turn Two? Is Turn Four reasonable, or too late? I begin to deconstruct the perfect scenario in which I see Gearseeker Serpent devouring my opponent. Now, build to this goal.

Here’s our lesson about autism acceptance, from Gearseeker Serpent:

BEGIN WITH A VISUALIZED GOAL IN MIND.

What is “autism acceptance” to you? What may have happened to encourage others’ acceptance? Will you need help? How much help do you think you’ll need, and when will you need help? Deconstruct the perfect scenario in which you feel most accepted, and identify those incremental steps towards tolerance. Now, built to this goal.

Without specific goal setting, we may lose focus. We might fail to acknowledge necessary early steps towards our goal if we only focus on the END GOAL. Others will liken us to some Greek Myth, whereby we gluttonously demand more acceptance, while ignoring acceptance growing around us, forever self-tormented. Stop demanding global, ephemeral autism “acceptance,” and develop your goals towards that result. Cultivate strategic planning, ask for help, and autism “acceptance” will happen.

Otherwise, Gearseeker Serpent and the weight of unfulfilled should-isms threaten to crush us individually and collectively. Please share your specific examples of autism acceptance goals in the comments, below.